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Assessment

RHONDA MOORE
Instructional Director of HS and MS Curriculum & Instruction

ASSESSMENT

Pendleton County Schools ensure students are achieving at high levels by using both formative and summative assessments to collect student data.  This data is used to make instructional decisions based on student needs.

For more information regarding state assessments, please visit KDE's website:  https://education.ky.gov/AA/Assessments/Pages/default.aspx 

Frequently Asked Questions:

Why give state tests?

State tests, such as the K-PREP tests, are given to measure how well students have learned content based on academic standards.  The test covers the areas of math, reading, writing, social studies and science.  The ACT test shows whether students are on course to graduate college-ready.  Results from these tests are used to determine where students may need help or accelerated learning opportunities and are also used for school and district accountability. 

When are state tests given?

Specific dates for High School testing have not been released.  Historically The ACT has been administered in March.  Dates for the 10th grade reading and mathematics field tests and the 10th grade college admissions test have not been released.    K-PREP tests are administered in the last 14 days of the school year.

When will results be available?

Test results will be available during the fall semester of the following school year and reported to parents. Parents will receive an individual report on the achievement of their child.

In what grades are state tests given?

2018-19 Testing Plan for Elementary, Middle and High Schools

Content Areas

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 10

Grade 11

Reading

X

X

X

X

X

X

FT 

 

Mathematics

X

X

X

X

X

X

FT 

 

Science

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 X

Social Studies

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 *

On-Demand Writing

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

College Admissions Examination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 X

X

FT: Field Test

*Assessments will be field tested when new Social Studies standards are developed.

Note:  No end-of-course assessments will be administered at high school.

Are students tested on writing?

Yes, Writing is tested in grades 5, 8, and 11. Writing portfolios may be used as instructional tools, but are no longer mandated as part of the accountability system.

Local Assessments

The STAR assessment is given to students in grades 3-8 two times during the fall semester and twice in the spring semester.  The purpose of the assessment is to gauge student growth in reading and math throughout the year and to support instructional practices in the classroom. The high school offers ACT scrimmages three times a year to students in grades 9-12 in reading, math, English, and science.  The purpose of the assessment is to monitor student growth, to provide data to staff for improving instructional practices, and to prepare students for the ACT test in the spring of the junior year and offer additional support to both juniors and seniors who take the ACT beyond the11th grade state assessment date.  STAR and ACT scrimmage data is available within days of the assessment administration.

 

How long will students spend taking assessments?

Students in grades 3-8 will spend no more than 5 days on state assessment. Each subject area has different time allotments as determined by the state.  Students in grade 11 will take the On Demand Writing assessment which is approximately 90 minutes.  Students typically spend 1 class period for reading and 1 class period for math during each testing session on the STAR assessment.  Students will typically spend approximately 1 class period for each subject area on the ACT practice assessment.  The actual ACT takes approximately 4 hours.  

 

Tips for Test Success

Know when tests are scheduled and keep up with results.

 Don’t schedule appointments, trips or other interruptions during testing.

Encourage your child to review beforehand and do his/her best on testing day.

Remind your child of the importance of reading directions carefully and notrushing through a test.

Review results with your child. Praise success and talk about what can be done for areas in need of improvement

Remind your child about the importance of test scores now and the impact they can have on his or her future.